Griffin Relief, Arausio

Griffin Relief, Arausio


History of slavery in North Carolina

Slavery was legally practiced in the Province of North Carolina and the state of North Carolina until January 1, 1863 when President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Prior to statehood, there were 41,000 enslaved African-Americans in the Province of North Carolina in 1767. By 1860, the number of slaves in the state of North Carolina was 331,059, about one third of the total population of the state. In 1860, there were nineteen counties in North Carolina where the number of slaves was larger than the free white population. During the antebellum period the state of North Carolina passed several laws to protect the rights of slave owners while disenfranchising the rights of slaves. There was a constant fear amongst white slave owners in North Carolina of slave revolts from the time of the American Revolution. Despite their circumstances, some North Carolina slaves and freed slaves distinguished themselves as artisans, soldiers during the Revolution, religious leaders, and writers. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]


Two Sigma: The hot new mover and shaker

Hedge fund giants Steve Cohen and Ken Griffin are joining forces to bail out a fellow trader whose positions in runaway stocks like GameStop have been getting hammered.

Griffin’s Citadel and Cohen’s Point72 Asset Management are investing a combined $2.75 billion into Melvin Capital Management, which has seen its recent bets on stock declines thwarted by a small army of investors with get-rich-quick dreams.

The fund, run by ex-Cohen lieutenant Gabe Plotkin, is down 30 percent, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The bailout comes as retail investors swarm online forums like Reddit board “wallstreetbets” to push each other to invest in cheap stocks with short positions against them using no-fee trading sites like Robinhood.

GameStop, which Plotkin has been betting against, had a short interest of 102 percent of its outstanding shares on Friday, making it a prime target for sending a stock higher through what’s known as a short squeeze.

Shares in GameStop soared roughly 178 percent between Thursday’s close and early trading Monday as investors sought to squeeze short sellers like Plotkin and Andrew Left, who complained last week of being threatened over his predictions that the stock would fall.

“He was short in a market that no longer allows people to stay short,” complained one hedgie. “Today, you take a position after doing the work then some guys on Reddit use their phones to buy penny stocks and you end up with your face ripped off. It’s nuts.”

“I’ve known Gabe Plotkin since 2006 and he is an exceptional investor and leader,” said Cohen, who will add $750 million to his existing investment in the fund. “We are pleased to have the opportunity to invest additional capital and take a non-controlling revenue share in Melvin Capital.”

Melvin Capital saw a gain of 47 percent in 2019 after losing money in 2018. About one-third Point72’s 2019 performance come from its $1 billion stake in Melvin.

Griffin and Cohen have openly competed for trading talent in the past, with Griffin once even hiring — and then firing — Cohen’s brother-in-law at Citadel.

But Plotkin — and hopes he will recover from the chaos — appears to have united the two men.

“Gabe Plotkin and team have delivered exceptional results over the history of Melvin,” Griffin said in a statement to The Post after confirming that Citadel and its partners will pump $2 billion onto Melvin’s books. “We have great confidence in Gabe and his team.”

“If Ken Griffin is giving $2 billion to Gabe Plotkin, he’s not doing it to be a nice guy,” said another hedge fund manager. “He clearly thinks Plotkin is going to bounce back.”


The Research Center offers free access to Ancestry Library Edition®, Fold3, HeritageQuest Online&trade, and the Oklahoman Digital Archives. These sites allow patrons visiting the Research Center to search, view, and print various items pertaining to genealogy and history.

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Griffin Relief, Arausio - History

Eliphalet Griffin (1824 – 1899) was born in Newburyport in 1824. He started out as a clerk for a dry goods store and then opened his own store downtown. The Newburyport Daily News reported that in the early 1850s he went to California, which would have been during the California Gold Rush and opened a successful and prosperous wholesale clothing house. When he returned to Massachusetts he worked for a firm in Boston that had a large contract during the Civil War that sold uniforms for the United States government. Eliphalet Griffin returned to Newburyport in the 1860s a wealthy man.*

In 1863 he married Elizabeth Balch of Newburyport and they had two children. The City Directories show Eliphalet living at 31 Tyng Street, however in 1869 he built a Second Empire-style house on what was then the corner of High Street and Columbus Avenue, and upon completion, it was reported in the Newburyport Herald that it was “one of the best Newburyport houses in modern times.”** The 1870 Census shows that Eliphalet is 44, Elizabeth is 40, their daughter Hannah is 5 and their son Eliphalet is 3.

The photograph of the Griffin Block ca. 1890–1899, The Snow Collection, The Museum of Old Newbury

31-35 Pleasant Street today

31-35 Pleasant Street today

Eliphalet built a beautiful three-story, Queen Anne/Panel Brick style building on Pleasant Street, now 31-35 Pleasant Street, completed in 1889 which still stands today. The first floor contained two storefronts, a series of offices on the second floor and a large hall on the third floor. The hall was known as Griffin Hall and was the scene of many dances in the 1950s, it also showed moving pictures before a law was passed that movie theaters must be on the ground floor. In 1890 the ground floor was occupied by the Boston Boot & Shoe Company and Kent & Bolton clothiers and finishers. Later it was leased to Woolworth’s and to Boxer’s Furniture among other establishments. ***

Griffin House

Eliphalet’s great passion, however, was building the Griffin House, the Home for Aged Men at 361 High Street across from Atkinson Common. In 1886 along with Albert W. Greenleaf and Lawrence B. Cushing, Epliphet created the Newburyport Society for the Relief of Aged Men. Eliphalet gave the society the lot of land and built the foundation of the brick building at his own expense in 1896. The building was completed two or three years later. Mr. Griffin died in 1899. Due to lack of funds, the home remained unfurnished and unoccupied until 1902. ^* Much of the original furniture and woodwork remains in the house today. The Griffin House contains 9 rooms, the men must be 65 and able to take care of themselves. Some of the staff have been there for over 3 decades, the home is a family and the inside feels and looks very much like it must have looked in 1906. It is a wonderful place.

Portrait of Eliphalet Griffin, courtesy of the Griffin House

Postcard of the Griffin House, courtesy of the Newburyport Public Library Archival Center

Postcard of the Griffin House, courtesy of the Newburyport Public Library Archival Center

Hallway of the Griffin House today

Furniture in the Griffin House today

The Griffin Fair

Eliphalet Griffin organized the most amazing fairs at his home on High Street to raise funds for the Home for Aged Men. One fair is described in the Newburyport Herald, Sept 21, 1887 in which 5000 - 6000 people attended. The main attraction was a “great air ship” 126 feet in circumference and 42 feet in diameter. Ultimately the balloon did not ascend, it was not able to be filled with the 150,000 feet of gas that was required. The Museum of Old Newbury has three photographs of the balloon.


© 2021 Griffin Capital Company, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

By “investment grade” we mean that we intend to invest in properties leased to blue chip tenants and/or companies with investment grade credit ratings. There is no guarantee all of our properties will be leased to blue chip tenants or companies with investment grade credit ratings. Blue chip companies are well-known publicly traded companies that typically make up the Dow Jones Industrial Average or the S&P 500 Index. Blue chip and investment grade descriptions are those of either tenants and/ or guarantors with investment grade credit ratings or whose non-guarantor parent companies have investment grade credit ratings or what management believes are generally equivalent ratings.

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Contents

The Delaware Army National Guard traces its origins back to August 31, 1655, when Swedish settlers were asked to take up arms to defend the colony against a Dutch attack on Fort Christina.

During the American Revolution, Delaware's First Regiment fought with General George Washington at the Battle of Long Island.

In the War of 1812 all Delaware volunteer units saw service at Lewes, where they comprised the bulk of force that drove off a British naval squadron seeking control of the Delaware River. The 198th Signal Battalion (ARNG DE), which traces its lineage to three militia units that were federalized during the War of 1812, is one of only nineteen Army National Guard units with campaign credit for the War of 1812.

In the Mexican War (1846–1847), the Federal Government would not accept volunteer companies but the Delaware volunteers were not content to stay home. After much red tape, a statewide composite unit was formed. They fought with distinction in the battles of Contreras, Cherubusco, Molino del Ray and Chapultepec where there were almost twice as many Delaware volunteers present as marines. The unit lost so many men in these actions it became known as "The Bloody 11th." [1]

The Militia Act of 1903 organized the various state militias into the present National Guard system. One of the units formed since was the 198th Coast Artillery (AA), which traces its history to the three militia units referred to above.

In response to the Wilmington riot of 1968, following the April 4 assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., Wilmington Mayor John Babiarz asked Governor Charles L. Terry Jr. for support from the National Guard. [ citation needed ] One week later, Mayor Babiarz requested the National Guard troops be withdrawn, but Governor Terry refused, and kept them in the city until his term ended in January, 1969. This is reportedly the longest occupation of an American city by state forces in the nation's history. [2] In the aftermath of the occupation, recruiting offices of all military branches were removed from locations within the city limits until the early 2000s.

In the 1980s, aviation regiments began forming in both the regular Army and the National Guard. The 150th Aviation Regiment was created in Delaware from the 150th Aviation Battalion of the 50th Armored Division.

Following the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, numerous units of the Delaware Army National Guard have deployed to Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.

Troops from both the Delaware Army and Air National Guard volunteered to support disaster relief operations in Louisiana and Mississippi in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

"Operation Arctic Vengeance I and II" saw over 300 DEARNG Soldiers volunteer to support the State of Emergency declared by Gov. Jack Markell following a pair of debilitating snowstorms from Feb. 7 through Feb. 12, 2010. DEARNG troops completed over 250 missions assisting local and state agencies with including Emergency Medical Services, fire calls, law enforcement, dialysis patient transport and civilian transport to warming stations. [3]

National Guard units can be mobilized at any time by presidential order to supplement regular armed forces, and upon declaration of a state of emergency by the governor of the state in which they serve.


Contents

From 1947 through 1956, each BBWAA voter used discretion as to who qualified as a rookie. In 1957, the term was first defined as someone with fewer than 75 at-bats or 45 innings pitched in any previous Major League season. [1] This guideline was later amended to 90 at-bats, 45 innings pitched, or 45 days on a Major League roster before September 1 of the previous year. [1] The current standard of 130 at-bats, 50 innings pitched or 45 days on the active roster of a Major League club (excluding time in military service or on the injury list) before September 1 was adopted in 1971. [1] [5]

Since 1980, each voter names three rookies: a first-place choice is given five points, a second-place choice three points, and a third-place choice one point. The award goes to the player who receives the most overall points. [1] [6] Edinson Vólquez received three second-place votes in 2008 balloting despite no longer being a rookie under the award's definition. [7] [8]

The award has drawn criticism in recent years because several players with experience in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) have won the award, such as Hideo Nomo in 1995, Kazuhiro Sasaki in 2000, Ichiro Suzuki in 2001, and Shohei Ohtani in 2018. The current definition of rookie status for the award is based only on Major League experience, but some feel that past NPB players are not true rookies because of their past professional experience. Others, however, believe it should make no difference since the first recipient and the award's namesake played for the Negro leagues before his MLB career and thus could also not be considered a "true rookie". [9] [10] This issue arose in 2003 when Hideki Matsui narrowly lost the AL award to Ángel Berroa. Jim Souhan of the Minneapolis Star Tribune said he did not see Matsui as a rookie in 2003 because "it would be an insult to the Japanese league to pretend that experience didn't count." [9] The Japan Times ran a story in 2007 on the labeling of Daisuke Matsuzaka, Kei Igawa, and Hideki Okajima as rookies, saying "[t]hese guys aren't rookies." [10] Past winners such as Jackie Robinson, Don Newcombe, and Sam Jethroe had professional experience in the Negro leagues.

Key Edit

Year Links to the article about the corresponding Major League Baseball season
Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
^ Denotes player who is still active
* Denotes year in which the award was shared
§ Unanimous selection
+ Denotes lead Major Leagues in that category

Major Leagues combined (1947–48) Edit

American League winners (1949–present) Edit

  • .306 batting average
  • 16 home runs
  • 91 runs batted in
  • .322 batting average
  • 34 home runs
  • 144 runs batted in
  • .306 batting average
  • 14 home runs
  • 63 runs batted in
  • 3.31 earned run average
  • 15 complete games
  • 15–15 record in 37 appearances (28 games started)
  • .308 batting average
  • 94 runs scored
  • 209 hits
  • 3.26 earned run average
  • 199 innings pitched
  • 20–6 record in 37 appearances (20 games started)
  • 2.85 earned run average
  • 227 1 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 16–10 record in 32 games started
  • .266 batting average
  • 21 stolen bases
  • 69 runs scored
  • .297 batting average
  • 56 runs scored
  • 39 runs batted in
  • .275 batting average
  • 3 home runs
  • 63 runs scored
  • .261 batting average
  • 30 home runs
  • 85 runs batted in
  • .255 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 86 runs batted in
  • 3.22 earned run average
  • 178
  • 2 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 15–7 record in 25 games started
  • .286 batting average
  • 20 home runs
  • 93 runs batted in
  • 2.33 earned run average
  • 243 innings pitched
  • 19–8 record in 41 appearances (30 games started)
  • .323 batting average
  • 32 home runs
  • 94 runs batted in
  • .260 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 70 runs batted in
  • .273 batting average
  • 44 stolen bases
  • 98 runs scored
  • 29.3 Power-Speed # +
  • .292 batting average
  • 8 home runs
  • 66 runs scored
  • 2.05 earned run average
  • 267
  • 1 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 17–12 record in 34 games started
  • .282 batting average
  • 11 home runs
  • 68 runs batted in
  • .302 batting average
  • 53 runs batted in
  • 52% caught stealing percentage in the field
  • .275 batting average
  • 9 home runs
  • 48 runs batted in
  • .293 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 61 runs batted in
  • .337 batting average
  • 11 triples
  • 73 runs scored
  • .323 batting average
  • .395 on-base percentage
  • 66 runs batted in
  • .331 batting average
  • 47 doubles
  • 105 runs batted in
  • 2.34 earned run average
  • 24 complete games
  • 19–9 record in 29 games started
  • .283 batting average
  • 27 home runs
  • 88 runs batted in
  • .285 batting average
  • 3 home runs
  • 58 runs batted in
  • .285 batting average
  • 8 triples
  • 52 runs batted in
  • .287 batting average
  • 10 triples
  • 81 runs scored
  • .289 batting average
  • 23 home runs
  • 87 runs batted in
  • 2.05 earned run average
  • 105
  • 1 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 8–4 record in 15 games started
  • .264 batting average
  • 28 home runs
  • 93 runs batted in
  • .254 batting average
  • 35 home runs
  • 100 runs batted in
  • .284 batting average
  • 27 home runs
  • 116 runs batted in
  • .273 batting average
  • 9 triples
  • 71 runs scored
  • .240 batting average
  • 33 home runs
  • 117 runs batted in
  • .289 batting average
  • 49 home runs
  • 118 runs batted in
  • .250 batting average
  • 3 home runs
  • 39 runs batted in
  • 1.69 earned run average
  • 85 innings pitched
  • 27 saves
  • .290 batting average
  • 9 home runs
  • 66 runs batted in
  • .281 batting average
  • 25 stolen bases
  • 78 runs scored
  • .290 batting average
  • 54 stolen bases
  • 93 runs scored
  • .283 batting average
  • 31 home runs
  • 95 runs batted in
  • .282 batting average
  • 24 home runs
  • 65 runs batted in
  • .277 batting average
  • 24 home runs
  • 84 runs batted in
  • .314 batting average
  • 10 home runs
  • 104 runs scored
  • .306 batting average
  • 30 home runs
  • 122 runs scored
  • .288 batting average
  • 18 home runs
  • 89 runs batted in
  • .293 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 108 runs batted in
  • 3.16 earned run average
  • 78 strikeouts
  • 37 saves
  • .350 batting average
  • 56 stolen bases +
  • 242 Hits +
  • 127 runs scored
  • .279 batting average
  • 24 home runs
  • 84 runs batted in
  • .287 batting average
  • 21 stolen bases
  • 92 runs scored
  • .239 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 64 runs batted in
  • 1.72 earned run average
  • 78
  • 1 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 23 saves
  • 3.63 earned run average
  • 186 innings pitched
  • 17–9 record in 30 games started
  • .317 batting average
  • 39 doubles
  • 86 runs scored
  • .272 batting average
  • 27 home runs
  • 85 runs batted in
  • 1.84 earned run average
  • 83
  • 1 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 26 saves
  • 2.73 earned run average
  • 69
  • 1 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 40 saves
  • 2.95 earned run average
  • 117 strikeouts
  • 13–10 record in 29 games started
  • .326 batting average
  • 30 home runs
  • 129 runs scored
  • 49 stolen bases
  • .293 batting average
  • 13 home runs
  • 53 runs batted in
  • .317 batting average
  • 36 home runs
  • 107 runs batted in
  • .279 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 68 runs batted in
  • 3.06 earned run average
  • 132 strikeouts
  • 11–7 record in 26 games started
  • .284 batting average
  • 52 home runs
  • 114 runs batted in
  • 128 runs scored
  • .285 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 4–2 record in 11 games started
  • 63 strikeouts
  • .313 batting average
  • 27 home runs
  • 78 runs batted in
  • 58 runs scored
  • .267 batting average
  • 11 home runs
  • 28 runs batted in
  • 37 runs scored

National League winners (1949–present) Edit

  • 3.17 earned run average
  • 5 shutouts
  • 17–8 record in 31 games started
  • .273 batting average
  • 35 stolen bases
  • 100 runs scored
  • .274 batting average
  • 20 home runs
  • 68 runs batted in
  • 2.15 earned run average
  • 15 saves
  • 15–4 record in 56 appearances
  • .278 batting average
  • 17 triples
  • 125 runs scored
  • .304 batting average
  • 12 home runs
  • 106 runs scored
  • .281 batting average
  • 17 home runs
  • 68 runs batted in
  • .290 batting average
  • 38 home runs
  • 122 runs scored
  • 3.08 earned run average
  • 188 strikeouts
  • 19–8 record in 33 games started
  • .312 batting average
  • 25 home runs
  • 96 runs batted in
  • .354 batting average
  • 13 home runs
  • 38 runs batted in
  • .268 batting average
  • 23 home runs
  • 77 runs batted in
  • .278 batting average
  • 25 home runs
  • 86 runs batted in
  • .260 batting average
  • 90 runs scored
  • .273 batting average
  • 9 triples
  • 101 runs scored
  • .318 batting average
  • 13 triples
  • 125 runs scored
  • .250 batting average
  • 12 home runs
  • 69 runs batted in
  • .284 batting average
  • 9 home runs
  • 72 runs scored
  • 2.76 earned run average
  • 251 innings pitched
  • 16–13 record in 34 games started
  • .275 batting average
  • 15 home runs
  • 82 runs batted in
  • .271 batting average
  • 4 home runs
  • 69 runs scored
  • 3.60 earned run average
  • 284
  • 2 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 18–11 record in 43 appearances (37 games started)
  • .260 batting average
  • 33 home runs
  • 87 runs batted in
  • 2.32 earned run average
  • 244 innings pitched
  • 15–10 record in 32 games started
  • .300 batting average
  • 12 home runs
  • 74 runs scored
  • .309 batting average
  • 30 stolen bases
  • 81 runs scored
  • 2.88 earned run average
  • 215 strikeouts
  • 15–9 record on 34 games started
  • 2.92 earned run average
  • 16 saves
  • 11–4 record in 77 appearances
  • 2.74 earned run average
  • 204 innings pitched
  • 14–7 record in 38 appearances (28 games started)
  • .282 batting average
  • 19 home runs
  • 65 runs batted in
  • .266 batting average
  • 23 home runs
  • 63 runs batted in
  • 3.46 earned run average
  • 242 innings pitched
  • 17–10 record in 39 appearances (30 games started)
  • 2.66 earned run average
  • 84
  • 2 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 17 saves
  • 2.48 earned run average
  • 8 shutouts
  • 13–7 record in 25 games started
  • .282 batting average
  • 49 stolen bases
  • 88 runs scored
  • .257 batting average
  • 26 home runs
  • 74 runs batted in
  • 2.60 earned run average
  • 276 strikeouts +
  • 17–9 record in 31 games started
  • 218 innings pitched
  • 7 Complete Games/3 Shutouts
  • 1.073 WHIP +
  • 1.69 FIP +
  • .267 batting average
  • 110 stolen bases +
  • 107 runs scored
  • 2.08 earned run average
  • 103
  • 2 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 36 saves
  • .300 batting average
  • 18 home runs
  • 79 runs batted in
  • .271 batting average
  • 46 stolen bases
  • 74 runs scored
  • .293 batting average
  • 24 stolen bases
  • 64 runs scored
  • .282 batting average
  • 28 home runs
  • 78 runs batted in
  • .294 batting average
  • 15 home runs
  • 82 runs batted in
  • .257 batting average
  • 20 home runs
  • 88 runs batted in
  • .318 batting average
  • 35 home runs
  • 112 runs batted in
  • .306 batting average
  • 16 home runs
  • 56 runs batted in
  • 2.54 earned run average
  • 236 strikeouts
  • 13–6 record in 28 games started
  • .291 batting average
  • 12 home runs
  • 59 runs batted in
  • .283 batting average
  • 21 home runs
  • 92 runs batted in
  • 3.40 earned run average
  • 233 strikeouts
  • 13–6 record in 26 games started
  • 2.41 earned run average
  • 19 saves
  • 12–7 record in 62 appearances
  • .295 batting average
  • 40 stolen bases
  • 87 runs scored
  • .329 batting average
  • 37 home runs
  • 130 runs batted in
  • 4.52 earned run average
  • 185
  • 1 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 16–8 record in 32 games started
  • 3.30 earned run average
  • 160
  • 2 ⁄ 3 innings pitched
  • 14–6 record in 27 games started
  • .282 batting average
  • 26 home runs
  • 82 runs batted in
  • .288 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 63 runs batted in
  • .292 batting average
  • 51 stolen bases
  • 119 runs scored
  • .324 batting average
  • 34 home runs
  • 97 runs batted in
  • .285 batting average
  • 23 home runs
  • 86 runs batted in
  • .321 batting average
  • 162 base hits
  • 84 runs scored
  • .305 batting average
  • 18 home runs
  • 67 runs batted in
  • 2.10 earned run average
  • 127 strikeouts in 77 innings pitched
  • 46 saves
  • .270 batting average
  • 22 home runs
  • 59 runs batted in
  • 2.19 earned run average
  • 0.98 WHIP
  • 12 wins
  • 2.69 earned run average
  • 1.14 WHIP
  • 9 wins
  • .275 batting average
  • 26 home runs
  • 99 runs batted in
  • .308 batting average
  • 26 home runs
  • 72 runs batted in
  • .267 batting average
  • 39 home runs
  • 97 runs batted in
  • .293 batting average
  • 26 home runs
  • 64 runs batted in
  • .260 batting average
  • 53 home runs +
  • 120 runs batted in
  • 103 runs scored
  • 0.33 earned run average
  • 0.63 WHIP
  • 53 strikeouts in 27 innings pitched

Wins by team Edit

Only the Arizona Diamondbacks have never had a player win the Rookie of the Year Award. The Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers have won more than any other team with 18.

Teams Awards Years
Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers 18 1947, 1949, 1952–53, 1960, 1965, 1969, 1979–82, 1992–96, 2016-17
New York Yankees 9 1951, 1954, 1957, 1962, 1968, 1970, 1981, 1996, 2017
Boston/Atlanta Braves 8 1948, 1950, 1971, 1978, 1990, 2000, 2011, 2018
Philadelphia/Oakland Athletics 1952, 1986–88, 1998, 2004–05, 2009
St. Louis Browns/Baltimore Orioles 7 1949, 1960, 1965, 1973, 1977, 1982, 1989
Cincinnati Reds 1956, 1963, 1966, 1968, 1976, 1988, 1999
Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins 1958-59, 1964, 1967, 1979, 1991, 1995
Boston Red Sox 6 1950, 1961, 1972, 1975, 1997, 2007
Chicago Cubs 1961-62, 1989, 1998, 2008, 2015
Chicago White Sox 1956, 1963, 1966, 1983, 1985, 2014
New York Mets 1967, 1972, 1983, 1984, 2014, 2019
New York/San Francisco Giants 1951, 1958–59, 1973, 1975, 2010
St. Louis Cardinals 1954-55, 1974, 1985–86, 2001
Detroit Tigers 5 1953, 1976, 1978, 2006, 2016
Cleveland Indians 4 1955, 1971, 1980, 1990
Kansas City Royals 1969, 1994, 1999, 2003
Miami Marlins 2003, 2006, 2009, 2013
Philadelphia Phillies 1957, 1964, 1997, 2005
Seattle Mariners 1984, 2000–01, 2020
Houston Astros 3 1991, 2015, 2019
Los Angeles Angels 1993, 2012, 2018
Milwaukee Brewers 1992, 2007, 2020
Tampa Bay Rays 2008, 2011, 2013
Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals 1970, 1977, 2012
San Diego Padres 2 1976, 1987
Texas Rangers 1974, 2010
Toronto Blue Jays 1979, 2002
Colorado Rockies 1 2002
Pittsburgh Pirates 2004
Arizona Diamondbacks 0 none

    Best Rookie (in MLB). Outstanding Rookie (in each league). (in MLB). (in each league). (all sports).
  • Rookie of the Year (film).
  1. ^ abcde
  2. Vass, George (July 1998). "History of the rookie award filled with controversy". Baseball Digest. 57 (7): 26. ISSN0005-609X.
  3. ^
  4. "Sports News". Associated Press. July 14, 1987.
  5. ^
  6. Goldstein, Richard (June 19, 2001). "Sam Jethroe Is Dead at 83 Was Oldest Rookie of the Year". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 16, 2009 . Retrieved November 11, 2008 .
  7. ^
  8. Cour, Jim (November 7, 2000). "Sasaki voted AL Rookie of the Year". Associated Press.
  9. ^
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140 ms 11.3% dataWrapper 80 ms 6.5% type 40 ms 3.2% Scribunto_LuaSandboxCallback::unstripNoWiki 40 ms 3.2% make_coins_title 40 ms 3.2% select_author_editor_source 40 ms 3.2% [others] 180 ms 14.5% Number of Wikibase entities loaded: 1/400 -->


What Did The Whig Party Stand For?

The Whigs were an opposition party formed to challenge Jacksonian Democrats, thereby launching the ‘second party system’ in America, but they were far from a single-issue party. Their ranks included members of the Anti-Masonic Party and democrats who were disenchanted with the leadership of seventh President Andrew Jackson. Their base combined unusual bedfellows: Evangelical Protestants interested in moral reform, abolitionists and those against the harsh treatment of Native Americans under Andrew Jackson in his rush to expand the country’s borders. In 1830, Jackson had signed the Indian Removal Act, but then ignored its tenets when he forced thousands of Choctaw to journey to Indian Territory on foot in what became known as “The Trail of Tears.” 

Some Whig leaders used anti-party rhetoric, though they were very much a political party on par with the democrats they opposed. Their diverse base meant the Whigs had to be many things to many voters𠅊 delicate balancing act.

Whigs were united in their support of the Second Bank of the United States (an institution Andrew Jackson deplored) and vocal opponents of Jackson’s propensity for ignoring Supreme Court decisions and challenging the Constitution. Whigs generally supported higher tariffs, distributing land revenues to states and passing relief legislation in response to the financial panics of 1837 and 1839. They were not formally an anti-slavery party, but abolitionists had more in common with the Whigs than the pro-slavery Jacksonian Democrats (Jackson was a vocal proponent of slavery and personally owned as many as 161 enslaved people). As the country hurtled toward Westward expansion, it was the issue of slavery that would be the ultimate downfall of the Whigs.


Robert Griffin III cleared to play

ASHBURN, Va. -- There was a major sigh of relief at Redskins Park on Wednesday when Washington rookie quarterback Robert Griffin III practiced and showed no effects from a mild concussion.

Barring any unexpected setbacks between now and Sunday, Griffin will start against the visiting Minnesota Vikings.

"It's a serious issue, but I felt fine when I left the locker room" after being injured in Sunday's game against Atlanta, Griffin said. "I went home, watched some TV and kinda just relaxed. I haven't had any symptoms at all. Practice went good. I felt sharp. I felt good. No symptoms of a concussion: no dizziness or (feeling) off-balance. I feel right today. We'll see what happens come Sunday."

Against the Falcons, Griffin was hit by Atlanta linebacker Sean Witherspoon while scrambling on third-and-goal in a 7-7 game, which the Redskins' lost 24-17.

Griffin, who did some cardio work and some throwing on Tuesday and will get evaluated every day before he's cleared for full contact, joked that his only symptom is "irritability" from continually being asked the same questions by the Redskins' medical staff to see how he's doing.

While Griffin, the No. 2 overall pick in April's draft, has been doing well since last Sunday, coach Mike Shanahan limited his participation in Wednesday's practice -- even though quarterbacks wear gold jerseys in practice in order to prevent them from sustaining contact.

"So far, so good," Shanahan said. "He had a good practice today. I thought he performed well. Each day we'll monitor him and if he feels good, we're gonna go with him."

Minnesota coach Leslie Frazier is preparing his team to face Griffin, but Shanahan said that despite the Heisman Trophy winner's good condition Wednesday, he has to prepare for the eventuality that backup Kirk Cousins might make his first start against the Vikings.

Cousins, who relieved Griffin against Atlanta and threw a touchdown and two interceptions in his pro debut, took more of the practice snaps than the fourth-round pick did last week when he only threw passes as the scout team quarterback preparing Washington's defense to face the Falcons.

"You gotta look at both ends of it," Shanahan said. "Something could happen tomorrow or the next day and you gotta be able to go just like you do in a game when somebody takes all the repetitions during the week and you lose (him) on the first play, the person behind him has to be ready to go."

Griffin, the NFC's third-leading passer and its leading rusher among quarterbacks, said he saw Weatherspoon coming as he ran toward the Atlanta sideline but didn't react quickly enough to protect himself.

"If I had slid a half-second earlier, I'd been safe. I tried to get down too late and he had already launched," Griffin said. "At that point, it was just a matter of absorbing the hit and I absorbed it the wrong way. I can't do that to my team, to the fans or to my family because a life is more important that the game of football.

"These things that happen to us (affect) us down the road and I gotta make sure I Iimit that. I gotta make sure I keep myself safe while still being the same player I am."

Veteran receiver Santana Moss believes Griffin has learned his lesson.

"Once you take one of those hits or two, it's evident," Moss said. "If it ain't a play designed for you to run, save your body. I think he knows that. We all know that if you have nowhere to go, get out of bounds."

The 22-year-old Griffin said his teammates have assured him he's already proven his toughness by getting up from punishing hits dished out by St. Louis and Cincinnati defenders.

"I promised I'd get up from hits like that and I did get up," said Griffin, who scored a touchdown after suffering a concussion last season at Baylor before being pulled from the game for good. "I don't have anything to prove. If you have to live to play another down, then you'll live to play another down."


Watch the video: EB Online Historical Battle #2 - Arausio